Write Medicine

Creativity and Failure in CME/CPD

February 01, 2021 Alexandra Howson PhD Season 1 Episode 1
Write Medicine
Creativity and Failure in CME/CPD
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Audrie Tornow is Managing Partner at Excalibur Medical Education. We talked about the role of creativity, intentionality, and failure in designing education content for clinicians in healthcare. 

 01:27 Introductions with Audrie Tornow

02:31 Audrie talks about her beginnings and journey into medical education: No one majored in CME…

04:34 Does anyone remember transparencies? 

05:50 How has your background in English informed the way you approach education design and delivery?

 “When we plan education, it has become something where everything has a purpose because cost is affiliated with it. Planning it out and knowing what we want, starting with the end in mind, has become more critical than ever.”

07:23  How do you personally define good learning for adults, especially for those working in healthcare?

 09:23 What’s your sense of what learners are looking for in their education during the COVID-19 pandemic?

 “We talk about online fatigue, but right now so many providers and partners out there are seeing larger metrics than ever in online activities. And so, we’re showing we’re versatile. We’re showing we can adapt.”

 14:11 What are some of the shifts you’ve seen in the last few months that really try to creatively engage with a) where learners are and the challenges they may be facing in their personal lives and b) getting around that virtual approach?

18:06 How was the ability of educators within the CME world changed in order to prepare them to work more fluidly and intimately with partners?

 21:53 How effective do you think our field is in openly discussing failure?

 “I think people think that demonstrating failure means you aren’t a trusted partner. That you aren’t a successful business. And that’s definitely a perception that’s valid, but I think there’s so much to be learned by saying ‘I tried this, here was the idea. And it didn’t work.’ And it might be that next partner that says, ‘Actually if you had just done this.’ They might be the missing piece.”

 24:02 You talked about the potential reemergence of print as something that might be increasingly appealing to learners. Can you talk a little bit about that?

Resources
Eric Weiner. The Geography of Bliss. Twelve. 2009.
Transparencies
Results of the Alliance 2016 Environmental Scan. Almanac.
Ben and Jerry Flavor Graveyard
Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education. ACCME Data Report 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 01:27 Introductions with Audrie Tornow

02:31 Audrie talks about her beginnings and journey into medical education: No one majored in CME…

04:34 Does anyone remember transparencies? 

05:50 How has your background in English informed the way you approach education design and delivery?

 “When we plan education, it has become something where everything has a purpose because cost is affiliated with it. Planning it out and knowing what we want, starting with the end in mind, has become more critical than ever.”

07:23  How do you personally define good learning for adults, especially for those working in healthcare?

 09:23 What’s your sense of what learners are looking for in their education during the COVID-19 pandemic?

 “We talk about online fatigue, but right now so many providers and partners out there are seeing larger metrics than ever in online activities. And so, we’re showing we’re versatile. We’re showing we can adapt.”

 14:11 What are some of the shifts you’ve seen in the last few months that really try to creatively engage with a) where learners are and the challenges they may be facing in their personal lives and b) getting around that virtual approach?

18:06 How was the ability of educators within the CME world changed in order to prepare them to work more fluidly and intimately with partners?

 21:53 How effective do you think our field is in openly discussing failure?

 “I think people think that demonstrating failure means you aren’t a trusted partner. That you aren’t a successful business. And that’s definitely a perception that’s valid, but I think there’s so much to be learned by saying ‘I tried this, here was the idea. And it didn’t work.’ And it might be that next partner that says, ‘Actually if you had just done this.’ They might be the missing piece.”

 24:02 You talked about the potential reemergence of print as something that might be increasingly appealing to learners. Can you talk a little bit about that?


Resources
Eric Weiner. The Geography of Bliss. Twelve. 2009.
Transparencies
Results of the Alliance 2016 Environmental Scan. Almanac.
Ben and Jerry Flavor Graveyard
Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education. ACCME Data Report 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction
Audrie's journey into medical education
Who remembers transparencies?
Audrie's background in English
Effective adult learning defined
Avoiding fatigue
Pilot projects
Partnerships
Failure and flavor graveyard
Print in education